Claire Fulton highlighting Port Elizabeth’s country spots. June 2015

Claire Fulton highlighting Port Elizabeth’s country spots. June 2015

In case you had not noticed, yes we are fans of the SA Country Life magazine. Take a peek at the June 2015 issue where Claire Fulton writes about ‘Pastoral PE.’ And oh yes, you need to know that she is from Port Elizabeth. Keep us in the spotlight please Claire.

http://www.countrylife.co.za/pastoral-pe/

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One Fine Day in March 2015.

One Fine Day in March 2015.

It’s been a long and cold winter in Port Elizabeth but the days are longer and we are seeing more light now, we are dreaming of that ‘One Fine Day’ in the March 2015 issue of SA Country Life magazine by Port Elizabeth’s Claire Fulton. Remember us please when next you plan your visit to Port Elizabeth.

 

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Port Elizabeth in the SA Country Life spotlight, issue Dec 2014.

Port Elizabeth in the SA Country Life spotlight, issue Dec 2014.

Yes we are VERY late with this, it was buried in some desk dust but we still want to share it.

We love it when SA Country Life Mag talks about our special city:)

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Port Elizabeth’s Alan Fogarty wins first prize.

Port Elizabeth’s Alan Fogarty wins first prize.

So nice to open the latest issue of SA Country Life and read of Alan Fogarty’s first prize that he won in the Image Club photographic competition. We know that guy! Alan runs his business here in Port Elizabeth called Alan Tours

The following piece on Alan is taken from his website http://www.alantours.co.za/

Always a free spirit, Alan has embarked on his own enterprise and offers tourists the wealth of his accumulated knowledge and know-how spanning more than 30 years in the wilds of Southern Africa. He is a qualified level three F.G.A.S.A. (Field Guides Association of Southern Africa) Tour Guide and a Specialist African wildlife nature guide with further qualifications having been obtained in Zambia and Mozambique. His interests are wide and varied, birds, botany and bushman paintings.; mammal, reptiles and more recently our cultural heritage, inspired by the myriad of ruins in the Limpopo river valley as well as the recent colonial history of the Eastern Cape with special emphasis on the tribal Xhosa and their leadership during a difficult era.

photographer: alan fogarty's first prize competition 'image club' sa country life aug 2015

Photographer: Alan Fogarty’s First prize in competition ‘Image Club’ SA Country Life Aug 2015

 

 

 

 

Eastern Cape’s expression of art.

Eastern Cape’s expression of art.

Proud to be highlighting the Eastern Cape’s expression at this years National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, Eastern Cape.

“Organised by the National Arts Festival team, Africa’s largest and most colourful cultural event offers a choice of the very best of both indigenous and imported talent. Every year for 11 days Grahamstown’s population doubles as people flock to the city for a feast of arts, crafts and sheer entertainment. Every hall or large room becomes a theatre, parks and sport fields become flea markets, normally quiet streets have to be managed by an army of temporary traffic wardens and every available bed in the city is booked. The festival offers more than 500 shows from opera, cabaret, drama and jazz to stand-up comics and folk music.While many come to take in the arts, others simply want to be there for the spectacle or to market products ranging from tie-dyed T-shirts and woven rugs to handmade jewellery and customised telephones. The festival operates out of the 1820 Settlers National Monument and is organised by the Grahamstown Foundation.”

Source: http://www.grahamstown.co.za/event/national_arts_festival

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Cormorant conference on Bird Rock, Port Elizabeth.

Cormorant conference on Bird Rock, Port Elizabeth.

On any day, at any time you are sure to find a cormorant conference in full swing, doing a balancing act on Bird Rock along the beachfront, Port Elizabeth. Why do cormorants often stand in the sun with their wings spread out to dry? They have less preen oil than other birds so their feathers can get soaked rather than shedding water like a duck’s; wet feathers probably make it easier for cormorants to hunt underwater with agility and speed. We find them rather comical to observe, they seem to be packed with ‘attitude.’ The white-breasted cormorant in particular seems to look wrecked and jagged!

The Cape cormorant is a bird endemic to the southwestern coasts of Africa. It breeds from Namibia south to the southern Cape Province. In the nonbreeding season, it may be found as far north as the mouth of the Congo, and also extends up the east coast of South Africa as far as Mozambique. In the 1970s the breeding population was estimated as over 1 million in Namibia alone. However, the IUCN now classifies it as “Endangered” due to a very rapid decline in the population over the last three generations. The Cape cormorant is an almost entirely glossy black bird, though in breeding condition it has a purplish tinge and a few white plumes on the head, neck, and cloacal areas. Its gular skin ( throat skin) is a deep orangey yellow; unusually for a cormorant, its lores are feathered. ( the lore is the region between the eyes and nostrils of birds, reptiles, and amphibians) The bird’s wing is about 240–280 mm in extent, and it weighs 800-1,600 grams, with little sexual dimorphism. They commonly forage in flocks, taking schooling fish from mid-water, such as pilchards, anchovies, and sand eels. Its prey are typically much smaller than those of the sympatric bank cormorant. Their major predators are black-backed jackals, which take the occasional adult while it is roosting, and nest-site predators such as great cormorants, eastern great white pelicans, and kelp gulls.

Source: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_cormorant

 

bird rock, port elizabeth

Bird Rock, Port Elizabeth

Always a seagull around

Always a seagull around

keeping busy doing nothing

Keeping busy doing nothing

cormorant conference on bird rock, port elizabeth

Cormorant Conference on Bird Rock, Port Elizabeth

getting up close and personal with the cormorants

Getting up close and personal with the cormorants

Not quite a board meeting

Not quite a board meeting

fishing break

Fishing break

 

 

Regular sightings of endangered African Black Oystercatcher, Port Elizabeth.

Regular sightings of endangered African Black Oystercatcher, Port Elizabeth.

oystercatchers along the rocky shore, port elizabeth

Oystercatchers along the rocky shore, Port Elizabeth

The African black oystercatcher is resident to the mainland coasts and offshore islands of southern Africa sometimes occurring as a vagrant in Angola and Mozambique. These pretty black birds are often seen wading and feeding on the rocks very near to Bird Rock, Port Elizabeth. They are large and noisy waders with completely black plumage, red legs and a strong broad red bill. The near-threatened oystercatcher has a population of over 6000 adults, which breed between November and April. The sexes are similar in appearance, however, females are larger and have a slightly longer beak than males. Juveniles have soft grey plumage and do not express the characteristic red legs and beak until after they fledged. The call is a distinctive loud piping, very similar to Eurasian oystercatchers. Its breeding range extends from Lüderitz, Namibia to Mazeppa Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Typically sedentary African oystercatchers rarely leave their territories, which include a nesting site and feeding grounds. These will usually be located on or near rocky shores where they can feed. The lifespan of an African oystercatcher is about 35 years, of which they are known to pair up for 25 years. Most mainland egg and chick fatalities are due to disturbance by people, off-road vehicles, dog attacks and predation by the kelp gull and other avian predators. Off shore pairs experience similar avian predation although most chicks perish due to starvation. African oystercatchers predominantly feed on molluscs such as mussels and limpets, although are known to also feed on polychaetes, insects and even fish. They are adapted to pry open mussels and loosen limpets off the rocks but have been recorded picking through sand to locate other food items.

Source: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_oystercatcher

variety of coastal birds, port elizabeth

Variety of coastal birds, Port Elizabeth

sightings of the oystercatcher along the humpback trail, p.e.

Sightings of the oystercatcher along the Humpback Trail, P.E.

A treat to spot an african oystercatcher in flight

A treat to spot an African oystercatcher in flight

african black oystercatchers, port elizabeth

African Black Oystercatchers, Port Elizabeth

Stark contrast in colour, the black against the red bills and legs of the oystercatcher

Stark contrast in colour, the black against the red bills and legs of the oystercatcher

Nelson Mandela Bay Soccer Stadium. Pristine.

Nelson Mandela Bay Soccer Stadium. Pristine.

Wonderful to be part of the tour of the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium yesterday with PEMBBA members. We never tire of the beautiful structure and setting. Thank you to Access Management team and PEMBBA Port Elizabeth Metro Bed and Breakfast Association for organizing the tour for us.

The Pitch: The playing surface is made of natural grass that was grown off site, in the St Albans area. The areas surrounding the pitch are made of artificial turf.The field that was originally laid was a mixture of kikuyu grass and rye grass. For the 2010 FIFA World Cup though, the field was be made up completely of rye grass. The field was designed to be able to accommodate both football and rugby. The pitch is maintained by a group of 5 people who work day and night to ensure the quality of the playing surface.  A ‘pitch grow’ lighting system is used to ensure that all grass on the pitch grows properly. A unit with 61 000 watt bulbs is used to help certain parts of the pitch covered by shadow due to the stadium roof.

Information drawn from Wikipedia.
Tonight at 7pm:  EP Kings vrs Sharks XV.

Go EP Kings go!

home of ep kings

Home of EP Kings

ready for atmosphere

Ready for atmosphere.

five years on and condition of the stadium remains pristine.

Five years on and condition of the stadium remains pristine.

dedicated team works around the clock to maintain perfect pitch.

Dedicated team works around the clock to maintain perfect pitch.

dazzling structure

Dazzling structure

nelson mandela bay stadium keeps watch over north end lake.

Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium keeps watch over North End Lake.

 

 

 

Mosaic art works of Sedgefield, Garden Route, South Africa.

Mosaic art works of Sedgefield, Garden Route, South Africa.

We can’t get enough of them, they are bright, colourful and gorgeous. Each one made us beam from ear to ear:)

Who makes them? Special talented people from Masithandane.

Who are they?

Take a peek:-

http://www.masithandane.org
https://www.facebook.com/masithandane.org?fref=ts

Forward in faith and hope in 2014  – helping our people effectively.
Masithandane means “let us love one another” and actions Faith, Love, Hope and Life in the Community.

 Our recent posting on Sedgefield:- http://dempseys.co.za/moving-slowly-through-sedgefield-s-a/

 

slow of sedgefield

Slow of Sedgefield

magnificent mosaic bench in a magnificent spot, sedgefield, sa

Magnificent mosaic bench in a magnificent spot, Sedgefield, SA

One of the most recent works is this poignant memorial to those who have died while at war

One of the most recent works is this poignant memorial to those who have died while at war

bright and cheerful fish watches over the majestic view towards gericke's point, sedgefield

Bright and cheerful fish watches over the majestic view towards Gericke’s Point, Sedgefield

the captain of the slow route

The Captain of the Slow Route

funky lady

Funky lady

Such amazing imagination to create this

Such amazing imagination to create this

lest we forget

Lest we forget

this massive heart of colour towers over the main road of sedgefield, sa

This massive heart of colour towers over the Main Road of Sedgefield, SA

Port Elizabeth features again in S.A. Country Life mag.

Port Elizabeth features again in S.A. Country Life mag.

It’s great to page through the September issue of SA Country Life magazine and spot coverage on Port Elizabeth and surrounding areas. The article “One Giant Leap” written by ex Port Elizabethan, Keri Harvey, highlights the top attraction that Lloyd Edwards of “Raggy Charters” has on offer: whale-watching boat trips from Port Elizabeth harbour into Algoa Bay.

On page 75 Port Elizabeth gets another mention at the end of the article “Pushing up Daisies”  about the Van Stadens Wild Flower Reserve which is on the outskirts of Port Elizabeth.

See our posting on the reserve:-  http://dempseys.co.za/explore-van-stadens-wild-flower-nature-reserve/

Dale Morris’ article “Free as a bird” on “Birds of Eden” also promotes our area. Although just inside the Western Province, Birds of Eden is only a 2 hour drive from Port Elizabeth. Birds of Eden is a world class free flight bird sanctuary, the largest in the world.

Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, we love this place! Thank you for the exposure SA Country Life! Come visit again:)

keri harvey writes about lloyd edwards

Keri Harvey writes about Lloyd Edwards

lloyd edwards of raggy charters

Lloyd Edwards of Raggy Charters

birds of eden, garden route

Birds of Eden, Garden Route

soak in the beauty at van stadens wild flower reserve

Soak in the beauty at Van Stadens Wild Flower Reserve

sa country life issue september 2014

SA Country Life issue September 2014