Concussed on deck, pygmy kingfisher gets a second chance.

Concussed on deck, pygmy kingfisher gets a second chance.

This bright beautiful flew into a window on our deck and was concussed for about 10 minutes. We kept it warm, chatted to it and fed it some water.  It was tiny and the colours were strikingly beautiful. Much to our delight it was up, up and away within 15 minutes of crashing.

 

The African Pygmy Kingfisher is approximately 12–13 cm in length. This is the smallest kingfisher species in the region. A very small kingfisher with rufous underparts and a blue back extending down to the tail. The dark blue crown of the adult separates it from the African dwarf kingfisher. The smaller size and violet wash on the ear coverts distinguish it from the similar malachite kingfisher.

Usually found singly or in pairs. Secretive and unobtrusive. The call is a high-pitched insect-like “tsip-tsip” given in flight. The African pygmy kingfisher is found in woodland, savanna and coastal forest, it is not bound to water. The African pygmy kingfisher’s diet consists of insects like grasshoppers, praying mantis, worms, crickets, dragonflies, cockroaches and moths. They are also known to take spiders which make out quite a large part of their diet. They also take geckos and lizards that are easily their length and small frogs, occasionally small crabs. They nest in tunnels that are dug in sandy soil banks.

Information taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_pygmy_kingfisher

More information on African Pygmy Kingfisher: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/birds/alcedinidae/ispidina_picta.htm

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. Good thing you found it otherwise it may not have been so lucky. It was great to see such a feel good story in between all the gloom and doom on social media.

    • Hi Jonker, thank you yes it was a cheerful few moments for us and yes agreed, something hopeful midst all the doom of the past few weeks. Will share some more ‘hope’ soon.

    • That’s fantastic, Kath! So pleased it was your window he crashed into! And what a beautiful but ed he is! Hope he didn’t have too big a headache afterwards!
      xxx

      • We often have birds flying into the windows, the windows are on a ‘wind break’ door mid deck with a garden view through the windows; the birds misread it resulting in a few fatal crashes but most birds seem to be a bit bewildered for a few seconds after crashing and then quickly fly off again.The beauty of this little bird was extraordinary, the colours were bordering on luminescent!